Did I Not Speak Peace To Your Mind?

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TheDiscipleMd

Recently I was inspired by a book entitled, “The Crucible of Doubt”, written by Terrly and Fiona Givens. I would recommend it.  There are wonderful concepts that reflect on the quest for faith, as states the subtitle. I quote from their book this insightful challenge.

“It is useful at such moments of doubt, if we can’t exercise faith in God, to exercise faith in ourselves. We can trust that it was a good and trustworthy self that once knew certain things to be true-and may one day again…remembering rather than experiencing moves us toward greater independence and insulates us from the vicissitudes of the moments. Brigham Young thought God’s intention was to make us as independent in our sphere as he is in His. Such independence may require that we learn to act on the basis of what drives us from within, rather than what acts upon us from without. It may be for this reason that the heavens close from time to time, to give us room for self-direction.”

If we struggle from time and time and doubt enters our mind, the Givens remind the reader:

“One can see the Lord gently tutoring us to replace immediacy with memory in section six of the Doctrine and Covenants, when He says to Oliver, “If you desire a greater witness, cast your mind upon the night that you cried unto me in your heart, that you might know concerning the truth of theses things.  Did I not speak peace to your mind concerning the matter? What greater witness can you have than from God?”

I am reminded that this life is full of highs and lows. This ebb and flow of life often includes our spirituality. In those low moments of doubt when we question if the Lord cares about us, or loves us, or even exits; perhaps we should remember the lesson of Oliver, and cast our minds on prior nights that the Lord spoke peace unto our minds!  What greater witness do we need?

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